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Consumers and prostate cancer research

Your voice and experience are important! As a consumer, you have a valuable part to play in helping to improve how prostate cancer is prevented, detected, diagnosed, treated and managed in the longer term.

Who is a consumer?

In your toolkit, we define a consumer as:

  • a person diagnosed with prostate cancer
  • a partner or family member of someone diagnosed with prostate cancer
  • a person at risk of getting prostate cancer
  • a member of the public who is interested in prostate cancer.

What is consumer research?

Consumer research studies are an important way for researchers to learn about the challenges men with prostate cancer and their families face and how their quality of life and survival can be improved. By taking part in this research, you can help make a difference.

What does it mean to be involved in consumer research?

What is involved in consumer research will differ according to the study. If you are eligible, you will be given information about the research project including its purpose, what you will be required to do, how long it will take, how your information will be kept private and who you can talk to about the study. You will also be given information on possible benefits and risks, and you will be required to give your consent. Make sure you understand what is required of you before you decide to take part in the study.

Join a consumer research study today

Taking part in consumer research is often an interesting and rewarding experience. Researchers could not do these studies without the help of people like you. This part of your toolkit provides a current list of research projects that are looking for consumer involvement.   

Check this page regularly for a list of consumer research projects that you may be eligible to join.

Note: all studies listed on this page must have current Human Research Ethics Approval. Unless otherwise stated, these are not PCFA studies, we do not fund them and are not involved in them. Please contact the researchers directly about these studies.

Anxiety in oncology patients

Researchers at The University of Melbourne are interested in psychological factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of anxiety in those with a lived experience of cancer, including prostate cancer

The survey questions will explore relationships between psychological qualities like emotions, attitudes, personality traits and beliefs, that may be linked to the development of anxiety. Some of the emotions include fears about illness or death, and some of the beliefs include weight, life, religion and meaning.

We aim to use this information to improve the support those with cancer receive following diagnosis, and to improve any psychological treatments they may go on to receive.

They would love to hear from you if you:

  • Have a current or previous diagnosis of cancer, including prostate cancer.
  • Are 18 years or older.

If you agree to participate:

Participation involves filling out a short online questionnaire on your phone or computer, at three time points. The 2nd and 3rd time points are optional, and you can choose to opt out at any time.

Your participation is voluntary, and all data will remain confidential.

If you would like to take part or would like more information, please click the link below:

Anxiety in oncology patients study

This research has been reviewed and approved by the Melbourne University Human Research Ethics Committee.

Shared decision making using multimodal Artificial Intelligence (MMAI) with digital histopathology for Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) use in men with intermediate risk prostate cancer managed with standard of care radiotherapy.

Researchers from GenesisCare are conducting a study investigating how a new prostate cancer test affects doctors’ treatment recommendations, and what the outcomes for patients are 5 years after having the test.

This laboratory test utilises artificial intelligence (AI) to assess digital pathology (tumour) images combined with prostate cancer history information from an individual patient.

The results of the test provide a likelihood of future risk of prostate cancer recurrence and whether a patient is more or less likely to benefit from ST-ADT (short term androgen deprivation therapy) treatment in addition to radiotherapy, on average. They may be used by doctors together with other information about a patient to make an informed treatment recommendation.

The AI test being used in the trial has not yet been approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia for patients with prostate cancer and is therefore considered experimental in this research.

They would love to hear from you if you:

have been diagnosed with intermediate risk prostate cancer and are planning to have radiotherapy.

If you agree to participate in this study:

A previously collected tumour sample of your prostate cancer will be requested for the trial. Before the test is completed, information regarding your prostate cancer and your doctor’s treatment recommendations will be collected.

Your participation in this research study is entirely voluntary. You are not obliged to take part.

If you would like to take part or would like more information, please click the link below:

The AsTuTe clinical trial patient information  

This research has been reviewed and approved by the St. Vincents Hospital Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee.

Researchers from the University of Southern Queensland and PCFA are conducting a study seeking to understand how best to improve the quality of support available for men on hormone therapy.

You may be eligible to take part if you:

  • have been diagnosed with prostate cancer and have started or are planning to start hormone therapy.

What’s involved?

  • All participants will receive support information about prostate cancer and hormone therapy in the mail
  • Some participants will also receive additional nurse telehealth sessions
  • All participants will be followed up at 3, 6 and 12 months after they join the study.

What’s next?

To find out more, contact the study team via this link PCEssentials.

Researchers from the University of Sydney are conducting a study investigating how the different sources of information people encounter prior to undergoing chemotherapy can influence expectation and subsequent experience of side effects arising from chemotherapy.

During this study you will be asked about the sources of information you used to understand your treatment (e.g., doctors, family, social media) as well as what side- effects you expected and experienced as a result of chemotherapy.

They would love to hear from you if you:

  • have undergone your first experience with chemotherapy for cancer in the last 12 months.
  • have received chemotherapy alone or in combination with other therapies (e.g. radiation therapy)
  • received your chemotherapy treatment in Australia, New Zealand, The United Kingdom or Canada
  • are aged over 18 and can speak English

You are not eligible for this study if you have been treated with immunotherapy and other targeted treatments. 

If you agree to participate, you will be asked to complete a 20 – 25 minute online survey.

Your participation in this survey helps us to better understand the sources of information people with cancer use and rely upon. This will enable us to focus our future research on ways to improve communication with cancer patients to reduce their burden of chemotherapy side effects.

Your participation in this research study is entirely voluntary. You are not obliged to take part.

If you would like to take part or would like more information, please click the link below:

Chemotherapy and Sources of information study

Researchers from the University of Southern Queensland and PCFA are conducting a study to understand your experiences of being on active surveillance for prostate cancer in an anonymous online survey.

They would love to hear from you if you:

  • have been diagnosed with prostate cancer and are currently undergoing active surveillance.
  • have been on active surveillance less than 12 months.
  • have not had any previous treatments (other than active surveillance) for prostate cancer (including focal therapies).
  • can read and write English to be able to complete the survey.

Survey questions include:

  • your understanding of active surveillance
  • your feelings about the information you received about active surveillance
  • any extra information you needed
  • any concerns you have had with active surveillance
  • any distress and/or physical symptoms you may have had or are experiencing.

Your participation in this survey is entirely voluntary. Please click the link below for more information or to register your interest:

Survivorship care and active surveillance

Please note: You are not obliged to take part.

You can also volunteer to be interviewed following completion of the survey, to further discuss your experiences.

Researchers from the University of Sydney are conducting a study to explore older adults with cancer and their caregiver’s experiences and views about treatment decision-making.

They would love to hear from you if you:

  • Identify as an older adult with an existing or previous cancer experience OR currently provide care for an older adult with cancer.
  • Are able to speak English.

If you agree to participate, you will be asked to complete the following research activities:  

  • Complete an online questionnaire (10-15 minutes)
  • Participate in a telephone interview (40-45 minutes)

Your experiences and thoughts will help us understand how treatment decisions for older adults are made and help us improve how cancer care is provided. 

If you are an older adult with cancer, please click the link below for more information or to register your interest:

https://redcap.sydney.edu.au/surveys/?s=PDKRCTWKKPDKMCAK

If you are currently providing care for an older adult with cancer, please click the link below for more information or to register your interest:

https://redcap.sydney.edu.au/surveys/?s=P7TN9X94FPM7KJH9

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